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    Andrews University
   
 
  Dec 16, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018

Substance Abuse


Return to: Student Handbook  

Andrews University is committed to providing a drug-free environment for learning and working. Such a commitment led the University to establish a Drug-Free Policy, which outlines clearly the University’s zero-tolerance position and strives to educate the student body on the advantages of a drug-free lifestyle. The University also helps chemically dependent students find resources to aid in their recovery.

Students are expected to remain drug-free. Drug-free means abstaining from the use of alcohol, tobacco and other mind-altering drugs. It also means refraining from the misuse and/or abuse of prescription drugs. The University also upholds all laws which prohibit the possession, use, manufacturing or distribution of controlled substances. The possession of drug paraphernalia and use of “look alike” or designer drugs including any or all parts of e-cigarettes, hookahs, vapor and hookah pens, etc., regardless of the substance delivered, are also prohibited and considered an offense of the Drug-Free Policy. A K-9 handler team is authorized by the University to conduct searches of campus facilities (see Campus Safety Services and Information ). Prohibited substances, materials and equipment will be confiscated.

Students who have reportedly used alcohol, tobacco or illegal substances or who were found to be in close proximity to alcohol, tobacco or illegal substances or drug paraphernalia may be required to participate in random, on-demand alcohol, tobacco and drug screenings as well as to engage in an educational course. In cases where there is not confirmed usage, costs related to tests required for students will be covered by the University if the results are negative and will be the responsibility of the student if the results are positive.

Voluntary Referral
All students can choose to voluntarily seek assistance in remaining drug- and alcohol-free. Faculty members, Counseling & Testing or Student Life professionals are available for consultations. No disciplinary action will typically be taken if the student initiates (without the information being already reported to or known by a University or law enforcement official) a voluntary effort to seek assistance. The student must provide, from the Counseling & Testing Center or a health-care provider, current documentation of having taken the voluntary initiative as well as evidence of faithfully following the established plan for attendance, treatment, removal of triggers and personal growth.

Substance use/abuse counseling is available from the Counseling & Testing Center. Limited services include the following:

  • Professional substance abuse assessment
  • Individual counseling
  • Support groups for chemical dependency

Mandatory Referral
If students are found in violation of the policy, the University will activate the following response.

Non-illegal Substance Violations
A first violation for a non-illegal substance use or possession will result in a suspension from the University. To be eligible to regain and/or continue student status, the student must fulfill the following protocol:

  1. Review and reaffirm commitment to a re-entry contract with a Student Life professional
  2. Sign a release of information consent form with a Student Life professional
  3. Serve an on-campus suspension from all organized campus activities as determined by the Student Life Deans Council as (a) an out-of-class suspension from classes and work for a minimum of three class days or (b) a two-week, in-class (required class attendance) suspension that includes:
  • Remaining in current residence
  • Suspension from all organized campus activities
  • Supervised academic success or voluntary service (15 hours)
  • Citizenship Probation (15 weeks)
  • Mentoring with a Student Life dean for a minimum of six weekly sessions
  • Other restorative and educational interventions
  • Making an appointment with the Counseling & Testing Center within three days to obtain a Substance Abuse Assessment
  • Accept responsibility for a minimum $100 fee
  • Requesting that the Counseling & Testing counselor submit to referring entity a verification of compliance with assessment appointments and a summary report of the assessment with recommendations for ongoing care
  • A psychoeducational course which includes attendance of six sessions and related assignments and an exit interview as outlined with the course counselor
  • Requesting that the Counseling & Testing counselor submit verification to referring entity of the completion of the six psychoeducational sessions

Illegal Substance Violations/Host of Events with Alcohol or Illegal Substances
Violations related to illegal substances or to the responsibility of planning and/or hosting events where alcohol and/or illegal substances are served and/or consumed, or to being the seller or supplier of the substances, or to attempt to solicit or facilitate the purchase or presence of the substances, will result in a more major suspension. A stronger response may also be put into effect when a student is underage or provides alcohol and/or illegal substances to underage individuals. A report will be made to the appropriate legal authorities if the student has violated laws regarding illegal drugs and controlled substances.

To be eligible to regain and/or continue student status the student must:

  • Serve a suspension which may be a minimum of one semester, during which time the student will be separated from the campus (under the terms of a campus ban) and all campus activities

Prior to returning to classes the student must:

  • Make an appointment with a licensed community Substance Abuse Counselor to obtain an assessment; accept responsibility for related fees
  • Sign a release of information consent form with the community Substance Abuse Counselor
  • Request that the Substance Abuse Counselor submit a summary report of the assessment, with recommendations for ongoing care, to the vice president for Campus & Student Life
  • Submit documentation of the completion of other restorative and educational interventions or voluntary service

Upon returning and registering for a future semester the student must:

  • Review and reaffirm commitment to a re-entry contract with a Student Life professional
  • Sign a release of information consent form with a Student Life professional
  • Complete with the Counseling & Testing Center a psychoeducational course which includes attendance of six sessions, related assignments and an exit interview as outlined with the course counselor
  • Participate in random, on-demand drug testing and accept responsibility for related fees (regardless of positive or negative results)
  • Serve a minimum 15-week Citizenship Probation that includes the removal of privileges (see Student Conduct Intervention (Disciplinary) Processes )

A second substance use offense or possession will result in, at minimum, a suspension from the University for the current semester and the ensuing semester during which time the student will be separated from the campus and all campus activities. A request for reinstatement will first require reapplication to the University.

Health Risks

There are many health risks associated with the use of alcohol and drugs—many of these risks are noted in the following comprehensive overview.

Alcohol 
Alcohol impacts the central nervous system as a depressant. The legal blood concentration limit to operate a motor vehicle in Michigan as well as other states in the region is .08. As the blood alcohol concentration rises, short-term effects include loss of concentration and judgment; slowed reflexes; increase in erratic emotions; disorientation leading to higher risk of accidents; and problem behavior. A person with a blood alcohol concentration of .40 and higher can become unresponsive or have respiratory arrest leading to death. Alcohol can cause effects that may include damage to liver, heart, pancreas and brain; malnutrition; high blood pressure; birth defects; cancer; and other illnesses. Alcohol can be highly addictive to some persons and is the most common drug used/abused in the world. The World Health Organization notes that alcohol is related to a wide variety of assaults including intimate partner violence and date rape. For additional information, visit niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/alcohols-effects-body and
who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/world_report/factsheets/fs_intimate.pdf?ua=1.

Amphetamines (pep pills, speed, bennies, crystal) 
Amphetamines are central nervous system stimulants. Use can cause effects that may include rushed, careless, aggressive behavior; pushing beyond one’s physical capacity, thus leading to exhaustion; insomnia; loss of appetite; a “crash” when effects wear off; a tolerance level that increases rapidly; and physical and psychological dependence where withdrawal can result in depression and suicide. Continued high doses can cause destruction of nerve cells in the brain; heart problems; stroke; infections; malnutrition and death.

Cocaine (coke, crack)
Cocaine stimulates the central nervous system and anesthetizes the mucus membrane. It can cause effects that may include impaired judgment; increased breathing, increased heart rate, and heart palpitations; anxiety, restlessness, hostility, paranoia and confusion; insomnia; damage to the digestive, respiratory and immune systems; mood swings; depression; paranoia; malnutrition, strokes, seizures and loss of brain function; and a severe “crash” when effects wear off. Cocaine is highly addictive.

Designer Drugs/Synthetic Cannabinoids (bath salts, K2, spice)
These types of substances are designed to mimic illegal substances of many types and can have the effects of illegal stimulants, hallucinogens and depressants. Their use can cause effects that may include elevated heart rate, blood pressure and chest pain; hallucinations, seizures, violent behavior and paranoia; lack of appetite, vomiting and tremor; kidney/liver failure; and an increased risk of suicide and death. For more information, see drugabuse.gov/news-events/latest-science/science-behind-designer-drugs.

Hallucinogens (PCP or angel dust, LSD or acid, ecstasy, dextromethorphan)
These substances impact and distort one’s perception of reality and can cause effects that may include dreamlike states while awake; catatonic or psychotic states; and extreme distortions of what is seen and heard. Hallucinogens induce sudden changes in behavior leading to accident and injury; emotional imbalance; loss of concentration and memory; impaired judgement; and increased risk of birth defects in user’s children. Overdose can cause psychosis, convulsions, coma and death. Frequent and long-term use can cause permanent loss of mental function as well as brain damage.

Inhalants (nitrous oxide, amyl nitrite, butyl nitrite, chlorohydrocarbons, hydrocarbons, glue or benzene sniffing, aerosol propellants, gasoline) 
These substances are volatile hydrocarbons in that they easily become vapor and are readily inhaled. They can cause effects that may include nausea, dizziness, fatigue, slurred speech, hallucinations or delusions. Inhalants may lead to rapid and irregular heart rhythms; heart failure and death; loss of feeling, hearing and vision; and permanent damage to the brain, heart, lungs, liver and kidneys. 

Marijuana (cannabis, grass, pot, weed) 
Marijuana impacts the central nervous system and can cause effects that may include impaired psychomotor functions; impaired learning ability and memory; impaired judgment of space and distance; aggravation of pre-existing heart and/or mental health problems; weakened immune system; and permanent damage to lungs, reproductive organs and brain function. Marijuana can also interfere with the physical, psychological and social development of young users. 

Opiates/Narcotics (heroin, morphine, opium, codeine, oxycodone, china white)
Drugs in this class are significant central nervous system (CNS) depressants. They can cause effects that may include physical and psychological dependence. Overdose can cause significant CNS depression resulting in convulsions, coma, cardiac and respiratory arrest and death. Long-term use can lead to malnutrition. Opiates and narcotics, when injected, can cause a wide variety of infections including hepatitis B & C; sharing needles is also a leading cause of the spread of HIV. Opiates/narcotics are highly addictive and tolerance increases rapidly.

Sedatives (barbiturates, downers)
Sedatives are central nervous system depressants and can cause effects that include reduced reaction time and confusion. Overdose can cause coma, respiratory arrest, convulsions and death. Withdrawal can be dangerous. In combination with other controlled substances, sedatives can quickly cause coma and death. Long-term use can produce physical and psychological dependence. Tolerance can increase rapidly.

Tobacco (cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco) 
Tobacco is one of the most addictive of all drugs. Smoking causes lung cancer, heart disease and emphysema; it may cause other cancers and diseases of the respiratory tract. Smoking by pregnant women may complicate pregnancy and may result in fetal injury, premature birth and low birth weight.

For an extensive list of health-related risks from substance use/abuse please visit the National Institute on Drug Abuse at drugabuse.gov/, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism at niaaa.nih.gov/, and the U.S. Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration at dea.gov/pr/multimedia-library/publications/drug_of_abuse.pdf.

Legal Ramifications

Violations of local, state and federal laws related to alcohol abuse or to the illegal use, possession, manufacture or delivery of controlled substances may result in misdemeanor or felony convictions accompanied by the legal imposition of sanctions. 

Categorization of Controlled Substances
As in many states, controlled substances in the State of Michigan are categorized using five schedules. Schedule 1 substances have a high potential for abuse and no recognized medical use. Schedule 2 substances also have a high potential for abuse but with some highly regulated medical uses. Schedule 3 substances pose a moderate risk of dependency with accepted medical uses. Schedule 4 includes prescribed substances with a low risk of abuse and limited addictive properties. Schedule 5 substances have a very low risk of abuse, but the potential still exists. Many are sold over the counter. Substances included in each schedule are listed on the website of the Michigan Legislature: legislature.mi.gov/%28S%28420wenfvn0xck03d3vy30osk%29%29/mileg.aspx?page=getObject&objectName=mcl-368-1978-7-72.

Overview of State of Michigan Sanctions
The following provides an overview of State of Michigan sanctions for offenses related to controlled substances as well as those related to alcohol. Please note that this overview is for educational use only. It is not a complete listing of sanctions and is not intended to be relied upon as legal advice. Laws are subject to change at any time and therefore some information provided below could be outdated. It is important to consult with an attorney regarding specific legal issues.

Michigan Sanctions Related to Violation of Controlled Substances

Examples/Schedule

Manufacture/Delivery

Possession

Use

 

Narcotics & Cocaine
(Schedules 1, 2)

< 50 grams*
Felony
Up to 20 years/jail 
Up to $25,000/fine 

< 25 grams*
Felony
Up to 4 years/jail
Up to $25,000/fine

Misdemeanor
Up to 1 year/jail
Up to $2,000/fine

Ecstasy, Molly & Methamphetamines 
(Schedules 1, 2)

Felony
Up to 20 years/jail
Up to $25,000/fine

Felony
Up to 10 years/jail
Up to $15,000/fine

Misdemeanor
Up to 1 year/jail
Up to $2,000/fine

Other Controlled Substances in
Schedules 1, 2, 3

Felony
Up to 7 years/jail 
Up to $10,000/fine

Felony
Up to 2 years/jail
Up to $2,000/fine

Misdemeanor
Up to 1 year/jail
Up to $1000/fine

Valium, Rohypnol, Xanax, etc. 
(Schedule 4)

Felony
Up to 4 years/jail
Up to $20,000/fine

Ephedrine, Codeine, etc.
(Schedule 5) 

Felony
Up to 2 years/jail
Up to $2,000/fine

Misdemeanor
Up to 1 year/jail
Up to $2,000/fine

Misdemeanor
Up to 6 months/jail
Up to $500/fine

Hallucinogens—
LSD, PCP, Peyote, Mushrooms, etc.
(Schedules 1, 2)

Felony
Up to 7 years/jail 
Up to $10,000/fine

Marijuana

< 5 kg./20 plants**
Felony
Up to 4 years/jail
Up to $20,000/fine

Misdemeanor
Up to 1 year/jail
Up to $2,000/fine

Misdemeanor
Up to 90 days/jail
Up to $100/fine

  * Greater quantities bring higher sanctions all the way up to life/jail and $1 million/fine
** Greater quantities bring higher sanctions all the way up to 15 years/jail and $10 million/fine

Michigan Sanctions for Violation of Alcohol Laws Related to Minors (under age 21)

  • Selling or Furnishing Alcohol to Minors
    • Misdemeanor; up to 60 days in jail and/or up to a $1,000 fine
    • Felony; up to 10 years in jail and/or up to a $5,000 fine if the consumption of alcohol by a minor is a direct and substantial cause of that minor’s death
  • Use of Fraudulent ID by a Minor or Furnishing Fraudulent ID to a Minor
    • Misdemeanor; up to 93 days in jail and/or up to a $100 fine
    • Offender’s driver’s license is suspended for 90 days; alcohol screening may be required
  • Purchase, Possession or Consumption of Alcohol by a Minor
    • Misdemeanor
    • For a first violation the sentence may include any or all of the following—up to a $100 fine; participation in a substance abuse prevention program; community service; substance abuse screening/assessment
  • Person Under 21 Transporting or Possessing Alcohol in a Motor Vehicle
    • Misdemeanor
    • For a first violation the sentence may include any or all of the following—up to a $100 fine; alcohol screening; community service; vehicle impounded for up to 30 days; 2 points added to the offender’s driving record

Michigan Sanctions for Drinking and Driving Offenses 

  • Operating a Motor Vehicle While Impaired
    • Misdemeanor
    • For first offense with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .08 or higher but less than .17, drivers face up to a $500 fine, up to 93 days in jail, up to 360 hours of community service, up to 180 days license suspension, 6 points added to the offender’s driving record, Driver Responsibility Fee of $1,000 for two consecutive years
    • For first offense with a BAC of .17 or higher, drivers face up to a $700 fine, up to 180 days in jail, up to 360 hours of community service, up to one year license suspension, 6 points added to the offender’s driving record, mandatory completion of an alcohol treatment program, Driver Responsibility Fee of $1,000 for two consecutive years
    • If under age 21, it is also against the law to drive with a BAC of .02 or more or with any presence of alcohol in one’s body except for that consumed at a generally recognized religious ceremony. First time offenders face up to a $250 fine, up to 360 hours of community service, 4 points added to the offender’s driving record, driver’s license restricted for 30 days, and a Driver Responsibility Fee of $500 for two consecutive years
    • Drivers with any amount of a Schedule 1 narcotic—such as marijuana, GHB or heroin—are subject to the same fines and penalties as drunk drivers, even if they show no signs of impairment
    • Anyone who refuses a breath test the first time is given an automatic one-year driver’s license suspension. For a second refusal within seven years, the suspension is two years
  • Open Alcohol Container in Vehicle
    • Misdemeanor
    • Community service and/or substance abuse screening/assessment
    • 2 points on a driver’s license
  • Marijuana or other controlled substances in vehicle
    • If an individual is pulled over by the police and an experienced police officer smells marijuana odor coming from the vehicle, the police officer may have probable cause to search the vehicle based on the odor emanating from the vehicle.
    • An individual may be held in possession of an illegal substance if it is found in the vehicle even if it is found in a backpack or container that is someone else’s property. 

Medical Marijuana
Michigan state law permits the use of medical marijuana, i.e., use by persons possessing lawfully issued medical marijuana cards. However, marijuana use, possession and/or cultivation is prohibited at educational institutions, which are recipients of federal funds and must be compliant with federal laws (including the Controlled Substances Act and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act). The use, possession or cultivation of marijuana for medical purposes is therefore not allowed on the property of Andrews University nor is it allowed at any University-sponsored event or activity off-campus.

Community Resources

Outpatient Facilities

Alano House of Southwest Michigan
4162 Red Arrow Highway
Stevensville MI 49127
800-837-4247

Alcohol & Chemical Abuse Consultants
3949 Sparks Drive SE, Suite 103
Grand Rapids MI 49546
616-957-5850

Allegiance Addictions Recovery Center
2424 West Washington Avenue
Jackson MI 49203

allegiancehealth.org
517-782-4001 or 1-888-848-9589

Anderson Substance Abuse Treatment Center
3501 Lake East Brook Blvd. SE, Suite 120
Grand Rapids MI 49546
616-975-0400

Pokagon Band Substance Abuse
56332 M-51 South
Dowagiac MI 49047
269-782-1142

Riverwood Center
1485 Michigan 139
Benton Harbor MI 49022
269-925-0585

Smoking Cessation Classes
Lakeland Healthcare
Two locations (St. Joseph & Niles)
269-927-5403

Memorial Epworth Health Discovery Center
100 W Navarre St #6670
South Bend IN 46601
574-647-1801

 

Support Groups

Adventist Recovery Ministries
12-Step Model of Recovery
Saturdays, 10:15 a.m., Nethery Hall
Friday mornings, Seminary Building
240-346-5204 or 269-815-5328

Hinman Counseling Services 
Pornography Support Group
640 St. Joseph Ave
Berrien Springs MI 49103
269-471-5968

 

Other Resources

Berrien County Health Department
769 Pipestone Road
Benton Harbor MI 49022
269-926-7121

Berrien County Health Department—Niles
1205 North Front Street
Niles MI 49120
269-684-2800

Substance Abuse Council
140 West Michigan Avenue
Battle Creek MI 49017
269-968-4699