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    Andrews University
   
 
  Nov 22, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018

School Psychology EdS


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The Ed.S. in School Psychology provides training for a professional career as a certified or licensed school psychologist. Ed.S.-level school psychologists work primarily in public and private school systems, preschool settings, and child-development centers. Typical responsibilities are assessment, diagnosis, consultation, program planning, and intervention services to preschool and school-age children with educational, emotional and behavioral problems.

Admission. Students may apply for the Ed.S. School Psychology program if they have an undergraduate degree in psychology, or a related field with at least 20 psychology credits.   Also required is an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.00; introductory courses in the following areas: statistics, learning theories or educational psychology, and human development; and current satisfactory scores on the GRE General Test. Applicants must also meet the general requirements listed in the Graduate Programs and Academic Information portions of the Admissions and Academics section of this bulletin.

All students entering the EdS program with or without a prior master’s degree in psychology, education, or a related field, must complete all courses for the MA Educational Psychology - Instructional Emphasis, or transfer in equivalent courses that meet the EdS requirements.  All coursework for the MA Educational Psychology, including comprehensive exams, must be completed prior to the beginning of a student’s school psychology internship. 

Prior to graduation, students are required to pass the ETS School Psychology (Praxis II) exam and submit a satisfactory portfolio in addition to the requirements below.

Prior to clinical experiences or classes with child contact, students will be required to complete a clearance form indicating whether they have been convicted of a felony. Having a prior conviction may make it impossible to complete the program.

Transfer Credits for Ed.S. in School Psychology. Students entering the EdS School Psychology program are required to complete at least 80% of required credits at Andrews University.  Fieldwork experiences are not transferable.

EdS Degree Requirements


Psychological Foundations—3


Educational Foundations—2


Research & Statistics—3


Total Credits: 65


Note:


See the School Psychology Program Manual for more information on other specific program requirements. Continuation in the School Psychology program is based upon a periodic review by the department faculty of the student’s academic performance and personal qualifications necessary to be a successful school psychologist.

Program Outcomes


The following outcomes guide the training and preparation of our School Psychology degree students.

Standard II: Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability

School psychologists have knowledge of varied methods of assessment and data collection methods for identifying strengths and needs, developing effective services and programs, and measuring progress and outcomes.  As part of a systematic and comprehensive process of effective decision making and problems solving that permeates all aspects of service delivery, school psychologists demonstrate skills to use psychological and educational assessment, data collection strategies, and technology resources and apply results to design, implement, and evaluate response to services and programs.

Standard III: Consultation and Collaboration

School psychologists have knowledge of varied models of consultation, collaboration, and communication applicable to individuals, families, groups, and systems and used to promote effective implementation of services.  As part of a systematic and comprehensive process of effective decision making and problem solving that permeates all aspects of service delivery, school psychologists demonstrate skills to consult, collaborate, and communicate with others during design, implementation, and evaluation of services and programs.

Standard IV, Element 4.1: Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills

School psychologists have knowledge of biological, cultural, and social influences on academic skills; human learning, cognitive, and developmental processes; and evidence-based curriculum and instructional strategies. School psychologists in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to use assessment and data-collection methods and to implement and evaluate services that support cognitive and academic skills.

Standard IV, Element 4.2: Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills

School psychologists have knowledge of human developmental processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social skills. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social goals for students of varying abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. Such interventions include, but are not limited to, consultation, behavioral assessment/intervention, and counseling.

Standard V:, Element 5.1 School-wide Practices to Promote Learning

School psychologists have knowledge of school and systems structure, organization, and theory; general and special education; technology resources; and evidence-based school practices that promote academic outcomes, learning, social development and mental health. School psychologists in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to develop and implement practices and strategies to create and maintain effective and supportive learning environments for children and their families.

Standard V:, Element 5.2: Preventive and Responsive Services

School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to resilience and risk factors in learning and mental health, services in schools and communities to support multi-tiered prevention, and evidence-based strategies for effective crisis response.  School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to promote services that enhance learning, mental health, safety, and physical wellbeing through protective and adaptive factors and to implement effective crisis preparation, response, and recovery.

Standard VI: Family-School Collaboration Services
School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to family systems, strengths, needs, and culture; evidence based strategies to support family influences on children’s learning, socialization, and mental health; and methods to develop collaboration between families and schools.  School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to design, implement, and evaluate services that respond to culture and context and facilitate family and school partnership/interactions with community agencies for enhancement of academic and social-behavioral outcomes for children.

Standard VII: Diversity in Development and Learning

School psychologists have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, and disabilities, and other diverse characteristics, principles and research related to diversity factors for children, families, and schools, including factors related to culture, context, and individual and role differences; and evidence-based strategies to enhance services and address potential influences related to diversity. School psychologists demonstrate skills to provide professional services that promote effective functioning for individuals, families, and schools with diverse characteristics, cultures, and backgrounds and across multiple contexts, with recognition that an understanding and respect for diversity in development and learning and advocacy for social justice are foundations of all aspects of service delivery.

Standard VIII, Element 8.1: Research and Program Evaluations

School Psychologists have knowledge of research design, statistics, measurement, varied data collection and analysis techniques and program evaluation methods sufficient for understanding research and interpreting data in applied settings. School psychologists demonstrate skills to evaluate and apply research as a foundation for service delivery and, in collaboration with others, use various techniques and technology resources for data collection, measurement, analysis, and program evaluation to support effective practices at the individual, group, and/or system levels.

Standard VIII, Element 8.2: Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice

School psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of school psychology; multiple service models and methods; ethical, legal, and professional standards; and other factors related to professional identity and effective practice as school psychologists. School psychologists demonstrate skills to provide services consistent with ethical, legal, and professional standards; engage in responsive ethical and professional standards; engage in responsive ethical and professional decision-making; collaborate with other professionals; and apply professional work characteristics needed for effective practice as school psychologists, including respect for human diversity and social justices, communication skills, effective interpersonal; of various service models and methods; of public policy development applicable to services to children and families; and of ethical, professional, and legal standards.  School psychologists practice in ways that are consistent with applicable standards, are involved in their profession, and have the knowledge and skills needed to acquire career-long professional development.

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