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  Oct 22, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018

School of Education


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Bell Hall, Room #105
269-471-3481; FAX: 269-471-6374
sed@andrews.edu
www.andrews.edu/sed

Robson Marinho, Dean

History

The School of Education has its roots in the Normal Department of Battle Creek College, the progenitor of Andrews University established in 1874 in Battle Creek, Michigan.

In 1901, Battle Creek College moved to Berrien Springs and became Emmanuel Missionary College (EMC). The Department of Education at EMC took on formal structure in the early 1900s. The preparation of church-school teachers gained importance as the church placed greater emphasis on Christian elementary and secondary schools. During those years it was not unusual for onethird of the college graduates to complete programs qualifying them to teach elementary or secondary school.

In 1956, responding to the need for graduate education within the church, the Autumn Council of the Seventh-day Adventist General Conference authorized the organization of a universitytype educational institution. In 1958 the School of Graduate Studies and the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary merged with EMC in Berrien Springs to become Andrews University.

By 1960 the Education Department offered master’s degree programs. Curriculum development was rapid with frequent changes in the course offerings and programs to keep up with the demands of students, society, and the church.

During the late 1960s, Andrews University began to consider application for National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) accreditation. The council considered and approved the university’s request for accreditation of its elementary and secondary teacher-education programs at both the baccalaureate- and master’s-degree levels beginning September 1, 1970. The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools approved the introduction of doctoral programs (1973) and granted accreditation to Andrews University as a doctoral-degreegranting institution in 1979.

In 1981, the department reorganized into three areas: Educational Leadership and Management, Educational and Psychological Services, and Teacher Education. The following year the PhD degree was introduced with approval of the North Central Association. In June 1983 the various undergraduate and graduate programs merged into a School of Education.

The School of Education currently consists of three academic departments:

  • Graduate Psychology & Counseling (GPC)
  • Leadership (LEAD)
  • Teaching, Learning & Curriculum (TLC)

Accreditation

Andrews University is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools to confer degrees at the bachelor’s, master’s, specialist, and doctoral levels.

The teacher-preparation and school-service personnel programs, which include teacher education programs, MAT programs, the elementary and secondary principals’ programs, and programs to prepare school psychologists, are accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and approved by the Michigan Board of Education and the North American Division Board of Education.

The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Post-secondary Accreditation (COPA), has conferred accreditation to the following program areas in the Department of Graduate Psychology & Counseling at Andrews University: Clinical Mental Health Counseling (MA) and School Counseling (MA).

The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) has approved the EdS program in School Psychology.

Faculty

The School of Education has selected a faculty based on diversity of experience and professional expertise. Equipped with advanced degrees, all have extensive experience in the areas in which they teach. They have authored books and published in professional journals. They are regularly sought as researchers, lecturers and consultants.

Conceptual Framework

Andrews University was founded as Battle Creek College in 1874.
One of the founders, Ellen G. White, presented a compelling
vision for education.

“True education means more than the pursual of a certain course of study. It means more than a preparation for the life that now is. It has to do with the whole being, and the whole period of existence possible to man. It is the harmonious development of the physical, mental, and spiritual powers. It prepares the student for the joy of service in this world and the higher joy of wider service in the world to come.

In the highest sense the work of education and the work of redemption are one.” Ellen G. White (1903), Education, Mountain View, CA; Pacific Press 13, 30.

The Andrews University School of Education embraces this vision as the organizing theme for its conceptual framework and mission.

A conceptual framework is a way of looking at the world that affects our values, goals and practices. It influences our work and how we think about what we do.

The School of Education, as part of Andrews University, has developed its conceptual framework by considering the University’s mission statement—Seek Knowledge. Affirm Faith. Change the World.—with respect to our specific task in training educational professionals.

Our conceptual framework helps us to clarify our purpose and mission—serving as a continual reminder of what we consider important and of how we approach our goals.

Dispositions
Dispositions are the personal characteristics our graduates will display, making them exceptional educators committed to fairness and learning for all students.

Elements
The six elements of our conceptual framework outline the principles driving our instruction and articulate particular dispositions and skills our graduates will take with them into the workplace. The elements are incorporated into all our courses and activities.

Element One: Worldview
We appreciate the perspectives of others and value the development of a personal philosophy from which action and service arise.

Our graduates will:

  • Explain worldviews and trace their historical development
  • Critique worldviews from a Christian perspective
  • Integrate principles of a Christian worldview into their chosen fields of study

Disposition: We value fairness, service and diversity.

Element Two: Human Growth and Change
We want to see growth, development and learning used to effect positive change.

Our graduates will:

  • Describe human development
  • Apply current theories of learning

Disposition: We believe that all students can learn.

Element Three: Groups, Leadership and Change
We want to encourage principles of group behavior that effect positive change for individuals and organizations.

Our graduates will:

  • Facilitate change in groups and orgnizations
  • Relate effectively with various cultural, racial and special interest groups
  • Identify political and legal issues
  • Manage human, financial and material resources
  • Demonstrate servant leadership

Disposition: We recognize personal leadership responsibility.

Element Four: Communication and Technology
We want to use technology to enhance communication, whether oral, written, intrapersonal or interpersonal.

Our graduates will:

  • Communicate effectively in written, verbal, and non-verbal forms
  • Use electronic tools effectively for professional communication, teaching and research

Disposition: We value respectful communication.

Element Five: Research and Evaluation
We both conduct and value disciplined inquiry for decisionmaking.

  • Our graduates will:
  • Read and evaluate research
  • Conduct research
  • Report research findings

Disposition: We are committed to inquiry.

Element Six: Personal and Professional Growth
We believe in holistic personal and professional growth.

  • Our graduates will:
  • Demonstrate continuing professional development
  • Demonstrate ethical behavior in all professional activities
  • Demonstrate balanced physical, mental, spiritual and social development

Disposition: We value personal and professional growth.

Mission Statement
To educate is to redeem
Educar Es Redimir

Philosophy

We believe that God is the ultimate reality and that He has chosen to reveal Himself through His created universe and through His Word. God created human beings in His image and for relationship with Him. When they rebelled against Him, they entered a state of brokenness that extends to every dimension of life. Through His love and mercy, God has provided in His son Jesus Christ the means to redeem human beings from their brokenness, to restore in them His image, and to reestablish their relationship with Him.

As Christian educators supporting the world mission of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, we conceptualize the task of education to be a partnership with God in His work of redemption and restoration. Our role in this partnership is to facilitate the spiritual, mental, physical, and social development of our students through modeling and exhortation.

Accordingly, we hold that:

  • God calls students to recognize Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord and through His Spirit to use principles of Scripture as a guide in their relationships with others.
  • God calls students to be worthy scholars in their chosen academic discipline and to contribute to that discipline as responsible practitioners and researchers.
  • God calls students to live by principles of good health as stewards of His gift of life.
  • God calls students to develop and maintain supportive personal and professional relationships and to use their talents in generous service to the church and society in a culturally diverse world. To these ends, we work for the glory of God.

Academic Calendar

In addition to the campus-wide calendar in the front of this bulletin, the following dates are specific to the School of Education.

 

2017
June
8 Thurs EdD/PhD comps (8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.)
9 Fri EdD/PhD comps (8:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.)
9 Fri MA & MS comps (8:30–11:30 a.m.; 1–3 p.m.)
9 Fri MA Clinical Mental Health Counseling, MA School Counseling & EdS comps (8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.)
12 Mon MA Clinical Mental Health Counseling, MA School Counseling Comps (8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.)
12 Mon EdS Comps (8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.)
12, 13 Mon, Tue EdD/PhD comps (8:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.)
     
July    
17-21 Mon-Fri Leadership Orientation
24 Mon Leadership Conference
24-26 Mon-Wed Leadership Roundtable Conference
26-28 Wed-Fri Creativity & Innovation Workshop
     
August
7-25   First Days of School Experience (Register for credit summer of 2014 or in the semester of student teaching)
21   RMES & AA begin
 
October
12 Thurs EdD/PhD comps (8:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.)
13 Fri EdD/PhD comps (8:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.)
13 Fri MA & MS comps (8:30–11:30 a.m.; 1–3 p.m.)
13 Fri MA Clinical Mental Heatlh Counseling, MA School Counseling & EdS comps (8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.)
16 Mon MA Clinical Mental Health Counseling, MA School Counseling comps (8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.)
16 Mon EdS Comps (8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.)
16, 17 Mon, Tue EdD/PhD comps (8:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.)
     
Spring Semester—2018    
March    
22 Thurs EdD/PhD comps (8:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.)
23 Fri EdD/PhD comps (8:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.)
23 Fri MA & MS comps (8:30–11:30 a.m.; 1–3 p.m.)
23 Fri MA Clinical Mental Health Counseling, MA School Counseling & EdS comps (8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.)
26 Mon MA Clinical Mental Health Counseling, MA School Counseling comps (8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.)
26 Mon EdS Comps (8:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.)
26, 27 Mon, Tues EdD/PhD comps (8:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.)
     
May    
3 Fri Teacher Dedication Ceremony (5 p.m.)

 

Undergraduate Programs

The undergraduate programs offered by the School of Education are described under Teaching, Learning & Curriculum .

Graduate Programs

The School of Education offers master’s, specialist, and doctoral degrees. A general description of each degree is provided below. Admission for any graduate degree offered in the School of Education is based on the total profile of the student and includes the analysis of admission documents as well as the professional judgment of the program faculty. Requirements for specific degrees offered in the three departments of the School of Education are described under the departmental headings.

MAT: Master of Arts in Teaching. The MAT program is an interdepartmental curriculum for teachers who desire a combination of professional preparation and subject-matter specialization in their graduate study. A teaching certificate is required for graduation. Degrees are offered in the  Department of Teaching, Learning & Curriculum.

MA: Master of Arts. The MA program is a one- or two-year program beyond the bachelor’s degree and is offered in all three departments of the School of Education.

MS: Master of Science. The MS program is a one- or two-year program beyond the baccalaureate degree for certified teachers who desire an endorsement in Special Education/Learning Disabilities. The degree is offered in the Department of Teaching, Learning & Curriculum.

EdS: Educational Specialist. The EdS program builds upon the master’s degree in providing a more focused program of study, generally taking a minimum of one year beyond the master’s level.

EdD: Doctor of Education and PhD: Doctor of Philosophy. The doctorate consists of course work and a dissertation, usually taking a minimum of two years of work beyond the master’s level.

Admission

Time to Apply. While early applications are recommended, the deadlines for application to the School of Education are as follows:

Domestic and Internationals students are required to complete and submit all the application requirements before the deadlines listed below:  

  • Spring (January - April): November 15
  • Summer (May - July): June 1

Fall (August - December): July 30

  • Application Procedure. In addition to meeting the general requirements for graduate admission (see Graduate Academic Policies ), applicants to the School of Education should note the following GRE requirements.
  • Official scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test taken within the last five years must be submitted. MA, MAT, and EdS students may be considered for provisional admission without these scores. School Psychology Program students must submit GRE scores before they are considered for any type of admission.

Scholarships/Financial Aid

Named scholarships are allocated in the spring semester for the following school year. Students wishing to apply for scholarships should obtain an application form from the School of Education Dean’s Office. The deadline for submitting applications is February 1. Application forms for regular grants are also available from the Dean’s Office. Applications for graduate assistantships should be submitted to the Dean’s Office. Applications for loans must be made through the Student Financial Services Office by April. See the Financial Information  section for further information.

General Academic Information

Academic Advisement. A student’s initial contact is with the department chair/program coordinator. Normally during the first semester of registration, a permanent advisor is selected. The advisor’s major tasks are to counsel with the student about academic requirements and expectations, and to help develop a course plan which meets these requirements.

Student Responsibilities. Students are expected to know the regulations governing academic matters. This bulletin covers general questions relating to academic policies. Although the policies in this bulletin have the weight of faculty action, practice, and precedent, special circumstances may occasionally warrant an exception. In such circumstances, students may use the petition process coordinated by the Graduate Programs Office, Room 151.

Procedures to follow in meeting the degree requirements are detailed in the handbooks which have been prepared for the master’s, specialist, and doctoral programs.

Responsibility for meeting degree requirements and following the specified procedures rests with the student. Each student is expected to be aware of the various requirements and procedures as published in both the bulletin under which he/she proposes to graduate and the handbook for the program in which he/she is studying. A student may choose to meet the requirements of any bulletin in force while he/she is continuously enrolled as defined for each degree program.

Student Grievance Procedure. Andrews University has a grievance (appeal) procedure for students who may oppose or question any practice, decision, and/or policy. The details of this procedure are found in each of the School of Education graduate handbooks and in the undergraduate Student Handbook.

Continuous Registration-Active Status. (Educational Leadership and Leadership students, please see the Leadership  section regarding continuous registration). Graduate students are expected to make continuous progress in their graduate program from admission through graduation. Continuous registration (except during the summer session) is required.

Continuous registration will be required beginning the first semester of taking classes following admission to the graduate program. Continuous registration allow students to remain active in the graduate program while physically absent from the campus.

Students must be continuously registered in at least one graduate credit applicable to the graduate program for every fall and spring semester until they complete all requirements for their degree or certificate. Students must also register for the summer session if they use university facilities or consult with faculty during the summer session. Students pursuing a degree during summer sessions only must be enrolled every summer in order to maintain active status in the program.

Leave of Absence. While graduate students are expected to make continuous progress toward completion of their graduate programs, there are instances where continuous registration is not possible. Students who need to temporarily suspend their studies must apply for a leave of absence through their advisor and committee chair. If the leave is approved, the student is placed on inactive status. Inactive status does not negate the policy which requires that all credits counted toward the degree or certificate, including transfer credits, be earned within appropriate period for a given degree prior to graduation. Students who fail to make continuous progress (see Continuous Registration above) or to obtain an approved leave of absence may be removed from active status.

Inactive Status. Graduate students who do not have continuous registration or an approved leave of absence will be placed on inactive status. Students who fail to request reactivation within the allowed time for program completion will be removed from a graduate program.

Doctoral students who do not make any progress on their dissertations for a period of 12 months may be asked to revise the composition of their dissertation committees. The dissertation chair and committee may reconsider their commitment to the student’s dissertation.

After being inactivated, students must make a request for reinstatement to a graduate program through the department. (See Graduate Academic Policies–inactive status )

Reactivation Process. Graduate students who have been removed from active status for failing to meet academic standards may apply for reactivation to a graduate program. When re-applying to the School of Education graduate program, it is the student’s responsibility to demonstrate his or her ability to succeed in the graduate program.

Graduate students who have been removed from active status for not making continuous progress (see Continuous Registration above) must re-apply to the department for reactivation into the graduate program and pay a reactivation fee of $613.  Students must follow the bulletin in force upon reactivation. (see General Academic Policies ) Students seeking reactivation must register for EDUC 560 - Degree Reactivation  course for “0” credits.

Upon approval of department chair, registration, and payment of the reactivation fee, a graduate student is considered active for the current semester. Reactivated graduate students must reapply for candidacy and may or may not be required to meet the program requirements which are in effect at the time of reactivation. Doctoral students may be required to select a new dissertation committee and/or topic.

Standards of Scholarship

  • To remain in regular standing and to graduate, students must maintain the minimum GPA (on a 4.00 system) required below:
    1. The MAT/MA: a minimum GPA of 3.00 in all courses for the degree and in all courses applied to the major/emphasis.
    2. The EdS: a minimum GPA of 3.20 in all post-master’s courses for the degree and in all courses applied to the major/emphasis.
    3. The EdD/PhD: a minimum GPA of 3.30 in all post-master’s courses (or post-specialist courses if EdS was received before admission to the doctoral program) for the degree and in all courses applied to the major/emphasis.
  • Students whose cumulative GPA drops below the minimum in any given semester are placed on academic probation. Such students must work with their advisors to develop a schedule of courses that ensures raising the cumulative GPA above the required minimum in a timely manner (normally the following semester). The Graduate Programs Office must approve the plan. Students who fail to meet the terms of such a plan are asked to withdraw.
  • No grade of D or F or U may count toward a degree. Courses with a grade less than a B- do not count toward the major or emphasis.
  • If a student receives an unsatisfactory grade (normally a D or F), the course may be repeated once. The credits and quality points earned in the most recent course will be used to calculate the GPA. Course grades may be replaced only by grades for course work repeated on campus.
  • Any student who receives a grade below B- (including U) in more than four courses in an MA program and in more than three courses (in addition to the four from the MA) in an EdS/EdD/PhD program is asked to withdraw.
  • Students may not apply credits earned by examination toward a graduate degree.
  • Candidates for the MA degree must pass comprehensive examinations and (if thesis option is chosen) formally defend a master’s thesis. Candidates for EdS degrees must pass comprehensive examinations. Candidates for PhD/EdD degrees must pass comprehensive examinations and formally defend a dissertation.

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). See the section on SAP Policy for Graduate Students with Financial Aid, Financial Information .

Transfer Credits. General requirements for transfer credits are found in the Graduate Academic Policies  section of the bulletin.  In addition, graduate course work taken at any Seventh-day Adventist college in the United States offering an MA degree may transfer up to 50% of the minimum credits required. Graduate credits taken in the MDiv program may be transferred into MA and EdS programs in the School of Education. However, 1 Master of Divinity credit will be marked down to .75 School of Education credits. Transfer credits from other Seminary programs need to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Time Limits. A student must complete the requirements for a master’s degree normally within six years, but no more than ten years from the beginning of the first semester of class work irrespective of admission classification. Leadership students please see Leadership program sections regarding program time limits. Course work taken more than six years but less than ten years prior to the graduation year must be updated in order to apply to the degree, if taken at Andrews University. Transfer courses for which advanced credit is requested must be taken within six years of the graduation year.

Master’s Degrees (MA /MAT/MS)

The master’s degrees (MA/MAT/MS) prepare personnel for leadership and specialized positions in education beyond the bachelor’s degree. While additional specific departmental requirements are described under the different departments, some general requirements are indicated below. Students are responsible for reading the Academic Information section of this bulletin. Also, students should consult the Handbook for Master’s Students or the Handbook for Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Students and Faculty.

Admission to MA/MAT/MS Programs. See the General Admission Requirements and the Minimum Academic Standards for Admission to Graduate Programs sections of this bulletin, Graduate Academic Policies .

General Requirements (MA/MAT/MS)

  • Students are responsible to note the requirements in the Graduate Academic Policies  section of this bulletin.
  • The candidate’s undergraduate background for advanced study must be approved by the department in which enrollment is sought. An applicant who receives provisional admission while having undergraduate deficiencies must remove these deficiencies with approved undergraduate or graduate credits before completing 50% of his/her course work. These credits do not apply to the degree program.
  • Students must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 32-48 credits (as determined by the program chosen). One-half of these credits must be in courses numbered 500 or above.
  • MAT students must satisfactorily complete at least 12 credits in the area of emphasis required by their chosen program.

General Requirements (MA/MS ONLY)

  • The program must include EDFN 500  and EDRM 505 .
  • All MA students must pass a comprehensive examination after they are advanced to degree candidacy. The examination is scheduled on specific dates each semester (see the School of Education academic calendar). The exam schedule varies according to the student’s program. An Application for Advancement to Candidacy form is filed upon completion of 50% of the student’s course work.
  • All MA students planning on taking comprehensive exams are registered for the   course for 0 credits after taking the exam. Students who fail the master’s comprehensive exam will have only one more opportunity to retake the exam. Students who fail the exam on their second attempt may be removed from the program.
  • All MS students—If you want to add this endorsement to your Michigan Teaching Credential, you must successfully complete the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC) subject area exam. In addition, you are required to pass a comprehensive examination after advancement to degree candidacy in order to obtain the Master of Science degree. The examination, which is scheduled on specific dates each semester (see the School of Education  academic calendar above), consists of one 3-hour session and one 2-hour session.

Preparation and Presentation of a Thesis. To fulfill the thesis option for a master’s degree, the student must write a thesis and successfully defend it in an oral examination at an officially designated time and place. See Handbook for Master’s Students.

The format of the thesis must conform to the guidelines found in the Andrews University Standards for Written Work.

Students elect to take either a thesis or non-thesis option. Those who plan to take additional graduate study should elect to write a thesis. Students who do not plan to pursue a specialist degree or a doctoral degree may substitute 3 semester credits of course work in the major area of emphasis in place of the thesis.

Guidelines for Practicums. Students in the MAT program which requires certification endorsements must take a practicum in accordance with these guidelines:

  • Students should take the practicum experience toward the end of their program after completing all required prerequisites.
  • Students must submit an application to the Certification, Screening, and Petitions Committee before January 31 to be eligible to take the practicum experience the next academic year.
  • The director of student teaching makes all arrangements for placement in schools.
  • Students must make a pre-practicum visit to the school before placement is finalized.

Transfer From One Program to Another. Acceptance into an MA or MAT program in the School of Education does not include the option of automatic transfer to another program at a subsequent time. A student in one of the programs may be permitted to reapply for the other degree program until the last day of the second semester. Upon application for transfer, advisors re-evaluate the student’s current program and make adjustments for the new degree requirements. Following that re-evaluation, those courses which are relevant to the second degree may be transferred.

Progression Through the MA/MAT/MS Degree Programs

Academic Advisement. Students initially contact the department chair or program coordinator. Then, during the first semester of registration, a permanent advisor is selected. The advisor’s major tasks are to counsel with the student about academic requirements and expectations, and to help develop a course plan which meets these requirements.

Advancement to Degree Candidacy. For information regarding advancement to degree candidacy for master’s degree students, see the General Academic Policies  section of this bulletin.

Educational Specialist Degree (EdS)

The specialist degree prepares personnel for leadership and specialized positions in education. It builds upon the master’s degree in providing a more focused program of study. In some cases the specialist program accommodates persons desiring career shifts and advancement in certification. Because the educational specialist program emphasizes practice rather than research, a dissertation and advanced research course work are not required.

The specialist degree should be considered a terminal program. However, doctoral students may elect to complete the specialist degree as a component of the doctoral program. Such an arrangement should be made in consultation with the student’s advisor and approved by the Graduate Programs Office no later than the first semester of course work.

Students are responsible for reading the Graduate Programs and Academic Information portions of the Admissions and Academics section of this bulletin. Also, students should consult the Handbook for Educational Specialist Students.

Admission to the EdS Program. Admission to a specialist program is based on the total profile of the student. To qualify for regular admission, the student must

  • Have a master’s degree or its equivalent from an accredited university (see Department of Graduate Psychology & Counseling for possible exceptions).
  • Give evidence of ability to pursue advanced study in graduatelevel work with a cumulative graduate GPA of 3.20 (4.00 system).
  • Meet all other admission standards listed in the Graduate Programs under the Admissions and Academic Information (Graduate Academic Policies ) sections of this bulletin.

Transferring Specialist Degree Credits. Graduate credits received from institutions generally considered to be diploma/degree mills are not eligible to be transferred into a degree program.

General Requirements. General program requirements are indicated below. Additional program-specific requirements are described in the departmental sections which follow.

  • The program requires a minimum of 64 semester credits of post-baccalaureate study.
  • At least 24 semester credits must be completed within the EdS program at Andrews University. This course plan must include at least two-thirds of the required minimum of credits in course work numbered 500 and above.
  • Students entering the EdS School Psychology program are required to complete at least 80% of required credits at Andrews University.  Fieldwork experiences are not transferable.
  • Major requirements for the completion of the program are determined by the individual department offering the degree.
  • A cognate in an appropriate supportive area may be required.
  • Two educational foundations courses:
    EDFN 500 - Philosophical Foundations for Professionals  —2-3
    and one of the following:
    Historical
    EDFN 517 - History of Seventh-day Adventist Education  —2
    Philosophical
    EDFN 610 - History and Philosophy of Education  —3
    Psychological
    GDPC 514 - Psychology of Learning  —3
    GDPC 614 Human Development   -3
    GDPC 625 - Biopsychology  —3
    GDPC 626 - Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior  —3
    Sociological
    EDFN 689 - Seminar in Foundations:  —2–3
    Theological
    EDFN 688 - Integration of Faith and Learning  —1–2
  • The student must submit evidence of competence in understanding and conducting investigations in his/her field of study. Depending on the particular program, a student may fulfill this requirement by doing one or more of the following:
    1. Course work in research and/or statistics.
    2. An advanced project featuring the systematic development of a significant educational product.
    3. A research study.
  • The minimum GPA required for completion of the program is 3.20 figured on all course work included as a part of the EdS program.
  • A minimum of two years work experience in the field of education or appropriate clinical experience is required before the degree is granted. The individual department determines the appropriateness of the experience.

Time Limits. A student must complete the requirements for a specialist degree within six calendar years from the beginning of the first semester of class work irrespective of admission classification.

Bulletin Requirements. A student may choose to meet the requirements of any bulletin in force after acceptance into the specialist program, as long as he/she maintains active status. If a break of enrollment occurs, the student must meet the requirements of a bulletin in effect after enrollment resumes.

Transfer of Degree Program

From One Specialist Program to Another. Acceptance into a specialist program in the School of Education does not include the option of automatic transfer to another specialist program at a subsequent time. A student in one of the specialist programs may be permitted to reapply for the other program up to the last day of the second semester. On such application for transfer, advisors reevaluate the current program of the student and make adjustments for the new requirements. Following that reevaluation, those courses which are relevant to the second degree may be  transferred.

From Doctoral to Specialist Program. Students already accepted into a doctoral program who wish to transfer to the specialist degree program in the same department are transferred by a Change of Program Application which is approved by the department chair and the Graduate Programs Office. The student must follow the current bulletin and submit a new Statement of Purpose and may be required to submit new recommendations. After receiving the specialist degree, the student may return to the doctoral program
by either of the following two options:

  1. By Change of Program Application with all previous doctoral requirements (course plan, time limits, etc.) in effect
  2. By online application to the GraduateEducational Programs Committee with all new requirements

Progression Through the EdS Degree Program

Course Plan. Normally, during the first semester the student and advisor work out a proposed course plan to complete degree requirements. This is submitted to the Graduate Programs office.

Advancement to Candidacy. Students must file an Application for Advancement to Degree Candidacy form which can be obtained from the Dean’s office or the Graduate Programs office.

  • Students must make application for advancement to degree candidacy before registering for the last 16 credits of course work.
  • Before filing an Application for Advancement to Degree Candidacy form, the student must
    1. Remove all deficiencies
    2. Demonstrate English Language proficiency (where required)
    3. Achieve regular admission status
    4. Have a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or higher.

After being advanced to degree candidacy, students may request to take the comprehensive examinations.

Comprehensive Examination. A written comprehensive examination is scheduled for specific dates each semester as noted in the academic calendar. Normally the Application for the Comprehensive Examination form and the Application for Advancement to Degree Candidacy form are filed together during the semester prior to the comprehensive examination. Students are not permitted to sit for the examination until they have been advanced officially to degree candidacy. All course work and the comprehensive examination must be completed within six years of initial registration for Andrews University specialist course work. Students applying for comprehensive examination must register for

 . Students who fail the specialist comprehensive exam will have only one more opportunity to retake the exam. Students who fail the exam on their second attempt may be removed from the program.

Preparation and Presentation of a Project. A department may require a project. Students should consult the Handbook for Educational Specialist Students for further information regarding the preparation, scheduling, and  presentation of a project.

 Doctoral Degrees (EdD/PhD)

The doctoral degree prepares personnel for leadership and specialized positions in education beyond the master’s or specialist degree. This program requires advanced research course work and the writing of a dissertation. While additional specific departmental requirements are described under the individual departments, some general requirements are indicated below. Students are responsible for reading the Graduate Programs and the Admissions and Academic Information sections of this bulletin Graduate Academic Policies . Also, students should consult the Handbook for Doctoral Students.

Admission to a Doctoral Program. Admission is based on the total profile of the student. To qualify for admission, the student must meet all the admissions standards listed in the Graduate Admissions section of this bulletin, including:

  • Earned master’s degree or its equivalent from an accredited university with adequate preparation for the proposed doctoral specialization (see the Department of Graduate Psychology & Counseling and the Leadership program for possible exceptions).
  • Evidence of ability for doctoral-level work as demonstrated by superior undergraduate- and graduate-level work and an adequate score on a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test taken within five years of admission.
  • Presenting a report that demonstrates adequate ability to undertake research. Students seeking admission to a doctoral program who cannot present evidence of research ability must register for appropriate course work which provides research experience as prescribed by the  departments the students are entering.

Transferring Doctoral Degree Credits. Post-master’s transfer credit, if appropriate to the student’s program, may be accepted if (1) the credits were completed within the time limitations indicated in the appropriate section of this bulletin and (2) the transfer complies with the provisions in the School of Education. A petition for transfer of credit is considered only after an official transcript for the course is received. Credits received from institutions generally considered to be diploma/degree mills are not eligible to be transferred into a degree program.

Exceptions. Exceptions to course-transfer regulations must be approved by the dean of the School of Graduate Studies & Research on a standard petition form upon the recommendation of the dean/graduate program coordinator of the college/school. Any such exceptions will be considered individually in the light of the master’s requirements. Exceptions for whole programs must be voted by the Graduate Council but thereafter do not need individual approval on petitions.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:

Students pursuing doctoral programs in Leadership, Higher Education, Educational Leadership see the Leadership Department Section. Students in Counseling Psychology and Educational Psychology see doctoral program requirements in the Graduate Psychology and Counseling section.  Students in Curriculum and Instruction see doctoral program requirements in the Teaching, Learning and Curriculum section.

ADDITIONAL GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:

The student must complete a minimum of 60+ post-master semester credits of which 32 credits in approved on-campus doctoral course work (not including the dissertation proposal (2) and dissertation credits (14) must be completed after acceptance into the doctoral program at Andrews University.  (A minimum of 24 credits of coursework is required for candidates with an Ed.S. degree from another institution and a minimum of 16 credits for candidates with an AU Ed.S. degree). The courses (excluding dissertation) must include a minimum of 6 credits numbered 700 and above.

The student may be required to complete a cognate or equivalent which includes a planned sequence of courses outside the major (see individual departmental requirements).

  • Students must successfully pass the comprehensive examination.
  • Students are required to take a minimum of 16 dissertation credits and write and defend a dissertation.
  • Students who have registered for the minimum of 16 dissertation credits and have not graduated and are still within the program time limit will register for dissertation continuation until graduation.
  • Students who registered for the total required minimum of 16 dissertation credits but have not graduated within the program time limit must register for one (1) dissertation credit each semester until graduation.

Time Limits

  • Time limits are determined by the specific program and the time length is counted from the first registration for AU doctoral course work. Students in the Department of Teaching, Learning & Curriculum must complete all requirements, including dissertation, within 10 years. Students in the Department of Graduate Psychology & Counseling must complete all requirements, including dissertation, within seven years. Students from the Department of Leadership must complete all requirements, including dissertation, within seven years.
  • All course work and the comprehensive examination must be completed within 5 years of first registration for AU doctoral course work.
  • The dissertation must be completed within 7 years of first registration for AU doctoral course work.

Full-time Status. For students who have completed all classes for the degree except dissertation and/or internship, full-time status requires the following:

  • Registering for one or more credits of dissertation, dissertation continuation, or internship every semester until graduation
  • Doing “full-time” work on the dissertation or internship as defined by at least 24 hours a week or 720 hours per year
  • Receiving confirmation by the dissertation chair or internship supervisor that full-time work is being done

For students who have not completed all classes for the degree, full-time status requires one of the following options:

  • Registering for 8 or more credits of course work and/or dissertation and/or internship
  • Registering for one or more credits of dissertation or internship; doing “full-time” work on the dissertation or internship as defined by at least 24 hours a week or 720 hours per year; and having approval by the dissertation chair or internship supervisor that full-time work is being done. Students may not take more than 16 credits during a semester.
  • Registering for LEAD600 allows a student to be considered a full-time student

Bulletin Requirements. A student may choose to meet the requirements of any bulletin in force after acceptance into the doctoral program, as long as he/she maintains active status. If a break of enrollment occurs and the student is placed on inactive
status, he/she must meet the requirements of a bulletin in effect after enrollment resumes.Transferring from one doctoral program to another within a department. Transfers between EdD and PhD degrees within the same department shall by Change of Program petition and can be made at any time during the student’s program. Original time limits are maintained.

Transfer of Degree Program

Students who wish to transfer between degree programs must submit a new application to the Graduate Enrollment Office.

Students can complete a Specialist degree en route to a doctoral degree by enrolling in a dual degree program. Also, Specialist students who want to continue their program into a PhD degree must submit a Dual Enrollment Application.

Progression Through the EdD/PhD Degree Program

Leadership students should see the Leadership Program section.

Course Plan. Normally within the first 16 credits, the student and advisor work out a proposed course plan to complete degree requirements. This must be approved by the department chair and the Graduate Programs office.

Research Requirements. Research requirements for the doctoral degrees include breadth, depth, and flexibility. Requirements are designed to enable doctoral students to critique journal articles that use common methodologies, statistics, and techniques; conduct research using appropriate
methodologies; write research reports, including the dissertation; and continue scholarly research activity beyond the dissertation.

Comprehensive Examination. A written comprehensive examination is scheduled for specific dates each semester as noted in the academic calendar. Normally the Application for the Comprehensive Examination form and the Application for Advancement to Degree Candidacy form are filed together during the semester prior to the comprehensive examination. All course work and the comprehensive examination must be completed within six years of initial registration for Andrews University doctoral course work. Students applying for comprehensive examination must register for EDUC870 Doctoral Comprehensive Exam. Students who fail the doctoral comprehensive exam will have only one more opportunity to retake the exam. Students who fail the exam on their second attempt may be removed from the program.

Advancement to Degree Candidacy. An Application for Advancement to Degree Candidacy form is filed after the student

  • Applies for the comprehensive examination
  • Completes all course requirements or registers for them
  • Removes all curriculum deficiencies
  • Removes any language deficiency

The student is advanced to degree candidacy when the comprehensive examination is passed, coursework is completed and a dissertation proposal approved.


Preparation and Presentation of a Dissertation. Students should consult the Graduate Academic Policies  section of this bulletin and the Handbook for Doctoral Students for information regarding the preparation, scheduling, and presentation of dissertations.

Distance Education


Office of Distance Learning/School of Education
Bell Hall, Suite 205
1-800-471-6210 option #1
odl@andrews.edu
www.andrews.edu/pdc


Faculty and Staff
Heidi Labbe, Supervisor

Partnership Courses

Courses have been designed especially for K–12 practicing teachers who are not on campus but who want to take a course for professional development, personal enrichment or continuing education credit. Students must have prior approval from a state regional teacher certification board or from the university which is providing their advanced degree or planned program to include these courses in their planned program.

New courses are added during the year. Please refer to our website for a complete list and partner contact information.

EDCI631 (Partner is Performance Learning)

EDCI632 (Partner is Quality Education)

EDCI633 (Partner is Teacher Online Education)

EDCI634 (Partner is Teachscape)

EDCI635 (Partner is Virtual Education)

EDCI641 (Partner is Learners Edge)

EDCI642 (Partner is Continuing Education for Teachers)

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